A successful EMBO Practical Course on targeted proteomics at the PRBB

Different targeted strategies have recently emerged in the field of proteomics that enable the detection and quantification of a predetermined subset of proteins with a high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility across many samples. Major advances have been achieved in the targeted proteomics workflow, including advances in instrumentation, the generation of thousands of publicly available targeted assays, and the development of multiple computational tools for convenient data analysis. This field is known as targeted proteomics and although it has successfully been applied in several research projects of molecular biology, systems biology and translational medicine, there is still a strong gap … Continue reading A successful EMBO Practical Course on targeted proteomics at the PRBB

First in Europe: one of the most precise Mass Spectrometers in the world

A couple of months ago, the CRG-UPF Proteomics Unit at the PRBB – run by the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) – announced the installation of one of the most precise mass spectrometers in the world, marketed as Orbitrap Fusion Lumos, becoming the first place in Europe and the third in the world to have this tribrid instrument. You can read more about this innovative mass spectrometer – which can achieve simultaneous analysis and quantification of more than 10,000 proteins from ten different samples in a single day! – in a post entitled “The CRG Becomes the First European Centre to Have One … Continue reading First in Europe: one of the most precise Mass Spectrometers in the world

Moving in, moving out

With more than 1,400 people working at the PRBB, the movement of researchers coming and going is constant. One of the most recent acquisitions is Eduard Sabidó, who has just arrived to be the new head of the CRG/UPF Proteomics Unit. Eduard is coming from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Zurich (ETHZ)  and will be leading this core facility which offers service to the whole park and beyond. A new young group leader has also joined the CRG recently. The French molecular biologist Guillaume Filion (who, as we mentioned in an earlier post, is currently looking for a postdoc) was … Continue reading Moving in, moving out

Mike Snyder: “It’s naïve to just look at one thing, we have to look at many levels”

Michael Snyder is the director of the Yale Center for Genomics and Proteomics, as well as Professor at Yale University. He studies protein function and regulatory networks using global approaches and high-throughput technologies, such as genomics and proteomics. During his visit to the PRBB he told us about the latest insights into human variation. What are the pros and cons of high-throughput technologies? There’s no question they are helping us advance in our knowledge. With genomics or proteomics experiments we discover things we would not have discovered by studying individual genes, and we have learned some basic principles out of … Continue reading Mike Snyder: “It’s naïve to just look at one thing, we have to look at many levels”

How does genotype determine phenotype?

Very interesting talk by Edward Marcotte today at the PRBB! He is an expert in proteomics, but touches all aspects of systems biology, and today he asked the following question: how does genotype determine phenotype? Can we predict the outcome of all the genomic variation we are uncovering with the many genomic projects we are doing nowadays? Well, his lab is certainly trying to do so, and using three different strategies which I will summarise very briefly: 1.  Using functional gene networks, which are based on data such as mRNA expression, protein-protein interactions (PPI), etc. These networks presumably are formed … Continue reading How does genotype determine phenotype?

“Insights from proteomics into cellular evolution and surprising disease models”

Don’t miss Edward Marcotte‘s talk next week at the PRBB!! Coming from the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology (ICMB) at the University of Texas at Austin, USA, Marcotte will give a talk entitled “Insights from proteomics into cellular evolution and surprising disease models” next Tuesday November 22 in room 473.10 at 12h. He has been invited by Gian Gaetano Tartaglia (CRG). Marcotte works in systems and synthetic biology, studying the large-scale organization of proteins. He tries to reconstruct the ‘wiring diagrams’ of cells, learning how all proteins are associated into pathways, systems, and networks. He is interested both in discovering … Continue reading “Insights from proteomics into cellular evolution and surprising disease models”