Open Science: not only a matter of outcomes, but also of processes

Post written by Toni Hermoso, bioinformatician at the CRG.   It’s been almost a decade since the term “Open Science” first appeared in Wikipedia. The page was created by Aaron Swartz and initially redirected to the “Open Access” entry. Some years later this young activist committed suicide as a result of the pressure from the judicial charges against him after having uploaded many privative licensed articles to the Internet. Parallel to these events, Creative Commons licenses, a set of recommendations intended to foster sharing in the digital world, became increasingly popular, and many novel publishing initiatives took advantage of them … Continue reading Open Science: not only a matter of outcomes, but also of processes

On data sharing and open science – interviewing Rebecca Lawrence (F1000Research)

Rebecca Lawrence has worked in scientific publishing for over 15 years and is currently involved in several international associations and working groups on data publishing and peer review. Rebecca was responsible for the launch of F1000Research in January 2013, a novel open science publishing platform that “uses immediate publication, transparent peer review, and publishes all source data”. She came to the PRBB to talk about the future of scientific publishing. What are the current challenges in scientific publishing? One is the delay between the moment you’re ready to share the science and when it actually gets out there and others benefit from … Continue reading On data sharing and open science – interviewing Rebecca Lawrence (F1000Research)