Bacterial DNA is consistently organised the same way in all the cells

Working together with colleagues in Spain, Japan and Australia, researchers led by Luis Serrano, ICREA research professor and leader of the Design of Biological Systems laboratory at the CRG, focused their attention on the organisation of DNA within an organism … Continue reading Bacterial DNA is consistently organised the same way in all the cells

Cells have an alternative plan when energy is needed in the cell nucleus

All our cells require the small molecule; ATP, generated in the mitochondria to cover the energy required for cell metabolism, dynamics and growth. To a lower extent and particularly in cancer cells, ATP can also be generated in the cytoplasm from the energy gained during degradation of glucose. These sources of ATP are sufficient to cover the energetic needs of cells in normal conditions. However, in response to stress-inducing external signals or to extensive DNA damage, the cells need to globally reprogram their gene expression pattern, a process that requires extensive remodelling of chromatin to gain access to the regulatory … Continue reading Cells have an alternative plan when energy is needed in the cell nucleus

A successful EMBO Practical Course on targeted proteomics at the PRBB

Different targeted strategies have recently emerged in the field of proteomics that enable the detection and quantification of a predetermined subset of proteins with a high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility across many samples. Major advances have been achieved in the targeted proteomics workflow, including advances in instrumentation, the generation of thousands of publicly available targeted assays, and the development of multiple computational tools for convenient data analysis. This field is known as targeted proteomics and although it has successfully been applied in several research projects of molecular biology, systems biology and translational medicine, there is still a strong gap … Continue reading A successful EMBO Practical Course on targeted proteomics at the PRBB

First in Europe: one of the most precise Mass Spectrometers in the world

A couple of months ago, the CRG-UPF Proteomics Unit at the PRBB – run by the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) – announced the installation of one of the most precise mass spectrometers in the world, marketed as Orbitrap Fusion Lumos, becoming the first place in Europe and the third in the world to have this tribrid instrument. You can read more about this innovative mass spectrometer – which can achieve simultaneous analysis and quantification of more than 10,000 proteins from ten different samples in a single day! – in a post entitled “The CRG Becomes the First European Centre to Have One … Continue reading First in Europe: one of the most precise Mass Spectrometers in the world

Challenging the model: transcription without the canonical histone marks

A guest post written by Silvia Perez Lluch, from Roderic Guigó’s laboratory at the CRG. You can find more about her career and work here. Transcription is a process that depends on many elements such as transcription factors, DNA methylation and chromatin structure. Histones are essential for the proper regulation of transcription, and the posttranslational modifications on their tails have been related both to activation (H3K4me3, H3K9ac and H3K36me3) and silencing (H3K27me3 and H3K9me3) of gene expression. Using the fruit fly as model organism, in our lab at the CRG and in collaboration with Montserrat Corominas’ lab in the Universitat de … Continue reading Challenging the model: transcription without the canonical histone marks

“Without 3D information it is very difficult to understand how the genome works”

Marc A. Marti-Renom is interested in three-dimensional structures. After eight years in the US dedicated to the world of proteins, the biophysicist returned to his native country, first Valencia and then Barcelona, to specialise in RNA and DNA folding. In 2006 he set up his own group, which today is divided between the CNAG, where there are ten people, and the CRG, where there are two. “We do the experimental part, the sample preparation, here in the CRG, and the sequencing and analysis happens in the CNAG”, he explains. For his research he requires a large sequencing and computing capacity, … Continue reading “Without 3D information it is very difficult to understand how the genome works”