Noise makes us ill and is a public health problem

Noise is one of the most important environmental stressors and represents a public health concern. Nowadays in Europe, 100 million people -one in five people- are exposed to high outdoor levels of road traffic noise (above 55dB) and 32 million to very high outdoor levels of road traffic noise (above 65 dB). In Spain, numbers are higher, with one in four people exposed above 55 dB. Despite emerging evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies, the effects of noise on health have captured little attention and are often disregarded. In one of the latest Health ISGLobal‘s blog posts, researchers Maria Foraster tells us more about this problem, including some … Continue reading Noise makes us ill and is a public health problem

New genes and functional innovation in mammals

In her latest post, Mar Albà, head of the Evolutionary genomics lab at the UPF-IMIM, explains her group’s research into new genes and their role in mammalian-specific adaptations. You can read the paper she refers to in bioRxiv, the preprint server for biology! “Many human genes have counterparts in distant species such as plants or bacteria. This is because they share a common origin, they were invented a long time ago in a primitive cell. However, there are some genes that do not have counterparts in other species, or only in a few of them. These genes have been born much more … Continue reading New genes and functional innovation in mammals

Pervasive translation of lncRNAS

Ribosome profiling is a sequencing technique that detects regions in mRNAs that are being translated. Using this technique, researchers have observed mysterious patterns of translation in many transcripts believed to be non-coding (lncRNAs, or long non-coding RNAs). The patterns are very similar to those observed in protein-coding genes but the translated proteins are generally smaller. Aside from their sequence, we know nothing about these peptides. Are they functional? Do they reflect some background noise of the translation machinery?       You can get some insights from a a recent study published in bioRxiv by the group led by Mar Albà at the … Continue reading Pervasive translation of lncRNAS

See you soon, Computational Oncogenomics lab!

Núria López-Bigas started her lab on Computational Oncogenomics at the GRIB, within the PRBB, ten years ago. After a very successful decade, we are sad to see her leaving. We wish her all the best in her lab’s new adventure, and we hope the very fruitful interactions she has started with the different groups at the park will continue to prosper. In her last post on her blog, Núria says thanks to the GRIB, the UPF, the PRBB community and the PRBB Intervals programme… We want to say, thanks to you Núria, for the great research you have done and for … Continue reading See you soon, Computational Oncogenomics lab!

A tutorial on Burrows-Wheeler indexing methods

Guillaume Filion’s latest post is aimed at those wanting to understand the details of how the Burrows–Wheeler transform (an algorithm used in data compression) works. It may be of particular interest to those genomics researchers working on alignments, since, Filion says, the Burrows-Wheeler indexing is used to perform the seeding step of the DNA alignment problem, and it’s exceptionally well adapted to indexing the human genome. For those of you who are not afraid of the small mathematical details, you can see this “The grand locus” post here. Continue reading A tutorial on Burrows-Wheeler indexing methods

Science for All and All for Air Quality

Citizen Science is blooming. There’s a growing number of examples of research projects in which the general population can participate. In this post at the blog Health ISGlobal, the researcher Irene Eleta (CREAL) talks about some of these projects which are related to air pollution and that scientists at CREAL /ISGlobal are leading, such as CITI-SENSE.     Continue reading Science for All and All for Air Quality