Noise makes us ill and is a public health problem

Noise is one of the most important environmental stressors and represents a public health concern. Nowadays in Europe, 100 million people -one in five people- are exposed to high outdoor levels of road traffic noise (above 55dB) and 32 million to very high outdoor levels of road traffic noise (above 65 dB). In Spain, numbers are higher, with one in four people exposed above 55 dB. Despite emerging evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies, the effects of noise on health have captured little attention and are often disregarded. In one of the latest Health ISGLobal‘s blog posts, researchers Maria Foraster tells us more about this problem, including some … Continue reading Noise makes us ill and is a public health problem

Juan Pablo Horcajada at IMIM: Antibiotics are getting less and less effective

Juan Pablo Horcajada coordinates the Infectious Pathology and Antimicrobial Research group at the IMIM, which was set up in 2014 and comprises fifteen people. “We are a clinical research group and we use our healthcare activity at the hospital to … Continue reading Juan Pablo Horcajada at IMIM: Antibiotics are getting less and less effective

Cathryn Tonne at ISGlobal: Linking air pollution to cardiovascular risk in India

Cathryn Tonne joined ISGlobal in 2015 to study the effects of air pollution and noise exposure. Her group mainly works on a European Research Council funded project called CHAI, which focuses on the link between cardiovascular risk and air pollution … Continue reading Cathryn Tonne at ISGlobal: Linking air pollution to cardiovascular risk in India

Bacterial DNA is consistently organised the same way in all the cells

Working together with colleagues in Spain, Japan and Australia, researchers led by Luis Serrano, ICREA research professor and leader of the Design of Biological Systems laboratory at the CRG, focused their attention on the organisation of DNA within an organism … Continue reading Bacterial DNA is consistently organised the same way in all the cells

The CRISPR-Cas system: the latest trend in gene modification

Article written by Rosa Martínez Corral.

In less than a decade, the field of genome engineering has been revolutionised by a series of techniques that now allow to accurately, efficiently and economically modify virtually any point in the genome of any organism. Continue reading “The CRISPR-Cas system: the latest trend in gene modification”

New genes and functional innovation in mammals

In her latest post, Mar Albà, head of the Evolutionary genomics lab at the UPF-IMIM, explains her group’s research into new genes and their role in mammalian-specific adaptations. You can read the paper she refers to in bioRxiv, the preprint server for biology! “Many human genes have counterparts in distant species such as plants or bacteria. This is because they share a common origin, they were invented a long time ago in a primitive cell. However, there are some genes that do not have counterparts in other species, or only in a few of them. These genes have been born much more … Continue reading New genes and functional innovation in mammals

Francisco Mojica: “I’m incredibly proud of having been part of the CRISPR revolution”

This is a longer version of an interview published by Maruxa Martinez-Campos in the July 2016 issue of El·lipse, the PRBB newspaper. Francisco M. Mojica is a microbiologist from Alicante, Spain, where he did his PhD and where he still teaches. He was the first to publish the workings of the CRIPSR-Cas system which has in recent years taken biomedicine by storm due to its many potential applications. Mojica, who recently received the Jaime I award for basic research, came to the PRBB to explain the history of CRISPR and what it means.   How did you discover CRISPR? It was … Continue reading Francisco Mojica: “I’m incredibly proud of having been part of the CRISPR revolution”